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Escape rooms · London

Right To The Throne

London, United Kingdom
Star 4.05 (4)
60 min
3 - 6 players
Easy
Good for:
Friends, Family, Couple
Historical, Dynamic, Fantasy
Pay online


Description

The Empire is in a great danger. The rightful heir to the throne has disappeared with no trace. Can you find out what happened to her and restore the peace? The future of the empire is in your hands…

Note: This escape room includes upgraded puzzles of our previous game called Professor Oxford’s Experiments. Even though the Throne Room has a completely new design, please only book if you and your team members have never played it before.


Player reviews

4 reviews
4.1
Use of technology
3.1
Immersion
3.1
Safety
5.0
Service
5.0
Fun for money
4.1
Add new review
Gaia B.
07 February

Plenty of new puzzle concepts, amazing props and set design! A few details could have been more immersive but overall recommended!

Gaia B.
04 February

The room was quite fun overall, we definitely enjoyed it and would absolutely recommend it!

A few of the puzzles were completely new concepts to us, despite having played our fair share of escape rooms, and there was a section of the game that was most definitely unexpected but really ingenious! Without giving away too much, I’ll just say that it was a new approach on how to move between different areas of the game, which all of us really enjoyed.

The game is a story-driven adventure with a few plot twists which are really nice and can keep attentive players engaged with the narrative. The ending offers a resolution to the events that, despite its simplicity leaves the players with a sense of achievement.

This room has a good mix of riddles / logical puzzles, and mechanical / practical tasks. Some puzzles require at least 2 players to cooperate, which means coordination and communication are really important, making this an extremely fun team-building experience.

Setting design and props are also all very well made and help with the immersion. Some parts of the set were really stunning and here was one element in particular that left us all amazed. There is a theme and a story to the game that makes the experience really exciting, and some of the puzzles have a proper role in the story themselves (for example, minor spoiler: to get a message delivered to you what better messenger than a raven flying over your head?)

We also really liked how players are required to interact with the entire room at once, and how unlocking new areas doesn’t mean you are necessarily done with the previous ones! There was a good balance of moving forward and going back to finally solve unsolved puzzles that you had almost forgotten about, allowing for that very satisfying moment of sudden realisation when you eventually remember!

A few things could be improved, however.

There was almost no briefing for us before the game except for safety regulations and a quick explanation of how to ask for hints. The story of the game was only communicated through papers and messages in the room, which we read, but that could have been easily ignored, especially if a team is worried about wasting any precious minutes of their allocated hour. Introducing the story to the players in the briefing could be a good way to get people into character before the stress of the countdown begins.

The immersion is also often broken by modern looking locks and keys, modern flashlights, and the beeping of radios when receiving hints. All these items could easily be replaced by more theme-appropriate props (older padlocks, like there already are a few, torches or lanterns instead of flashlights, a different hint communication system, etc..). Sometimes escape rooms provide costumes for players to engage themselves in the story even more, especially when the setting is historical or fantasy, like it is in this case, and everyday clothes are a bit out of character. This isn’t necessarily something the room is lacking, as not everyone appreciates dressing up in costumes, but it could have been offered as another extra step to involve the players, if they wanted to.

Almost all the puzzles in this escape room are clever ways to hide codes and keys. The room is basically entirely based on unlocking padlocks, and even though the process of finding a way to do so is often really original and fun, this room could use some variation. Moreover, good part of the puzzles revealed number combinations, that then unlocked various combination locks. Since all the codes seemed to be of the same type (only numbers and same number of digits), the padlocks were labelled with very obvious words referring to which puzzles revealed their code. We felt like that was a missed opportunity to include some more subtle hints (symbols? More cryptic words?) and give the puzzles an extra level of difficulty, instead of spoon-feeding the answer to players in a very evident and non-immersive way.

A couple of puzzles didn’t feel very satisfying to us. One of the smaller puzzles in particular we found very disappointing. It seemed too easy to solve, to the point where we suspected, it might have been broken or it might have been missing some pieces. However, the staff confirmed at the end of the game that the puzzle was just meant to be a very easy one, which seems really strange because honestly it didn’t even feel like a puzzle at all the way we found it. Another puzzle that left me a bit perplexed was a maths problem that was actually very simple but was posed in way that made it look like the answer could have been totally arbitrary.

Finally, despite telling a story though various messages trying to explain some of the puzzles and giving them a context, there are definitely elements of pure and simple “treasure hunting”, where doing one thing will lead you to something else with seemingly no consequentiality. This is very common in escape games, and almost impossible to avoid to a certain extent, but it’s definitely a plus when a room is able to create a consistent story-line from the beginning to the end of the game.

Despite the few things we think could be bettered, overall the experience was very positive. The staff was nice, welcoming, and knew when to give hints and when to give us time to think.

The room is non-linear and there are several puzzles that can be solved at the same time, so it’s suitable for bigger groups allowing players to split and work on separate tasks at the same time. Eventually, though, it’s still fundamental to communicate each other’s finds in order to proceed!

It is also not a scary room, and it is definitely suitable for kids. Some puzzles might be challenging but with a full team and the right amount of hits it’s definitely a room for all ages!


FAQ

What is a Live Escape Game?

A small group (usually 3-6) of people is locked up in a room filled with hidden keys, various objects, puzzles, riddles and challenging games. You’ve got 60 minutes to solve all the puzzles and to open the final door. No hard physical exercises or scary elements involved.

Can we play as a couple? What about 6 or more players?

If you are interested in playing with 2 players, you can contact us using the email address on our Contact Us page. Escaping the room is possible but quite challenging for two players. It’s only recommended if you have some experience in these type of games and you are very good at puzzles. Teams of 2’s have the lowest success rate. Playing with 6 team members is recommended only if you have a tight group and really want everybody to play together. It’s still fun to play with so many friends, but there will be less to do per individuals.

Is there an age limit for the game?

Players of all ages are welcome, however, some of the games are more complex and require the combinational skills of an adult. Our escape room is recommended for 16 year olds or above. If there are children in your group, it’s advised to have at least 2 adults with them.

Is it possible for 2 teams to race against each other at the same time in two rooms?

Yes, it is possible. The groups can play at the same time (in 2 different rooms). We can change the starting time of the games for you so that both team could start at the same time. Please let us know if you are looking to book to parallel games. An Example: You can book the Professor Oxford’s Experiments room for 6 pm and the Da Vinci’s Exploration room for 6:30 pm. In this case both games can start at 6:00 pm (or 6:30 pm).

What time should I arrive to the game and how long does it last exactly?

Please try to show up only 5 minutes earlier than your booking time. If you come earlier than that, other groups can spoil the experience for you. There are plenty of shops, restaurants and pubs in the area to spend some time before your game starts. We’d like to avoid delays for groups coming after you so please don’t be late. If you are late for more than 10 minutes of the original starting time of your booking, then the length of your session might gets reduced. There is an instruction before the game as well, the whole experience can last up to 75 minutes. If you are quick, it can be less than an hour.

How Escape Games Help With Team Building

Escape rooms are among top games which have been used by many corporations to foster team development. Employees will easily develop team work skills after they have been subjected to conditions such as escape rooms. The rooms will require the employees to develop corporation where each individual will be required to contribute towards the success of the team in escaping from the room. It is among the best places where you can go with your colleges so that you will interact and know each other more. Many companies which have taken their employees to escape rooms have achieved great. This is due to the interaction which the teams develop.

Main Benefits for Team Building

– Escape games develop respect for contribution

– Escape games build camaraderie through timed pressure

– Escape games uncover communication styles

– Encourages workers to listen to each other

– Makes the team realize contribution of the members


Location

Right To The Throne

Oxford St, London W1D 2DU, UK
City of Westminster, London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom

Availability and prices

Players

Free cancellation

What else need to know

Who can come

Guests aged 18 and up can attend. Guests aged 16 - 17 can attend with adults.

Availability and prices

Players

Free cancellation